Table_6_Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 and Colorectal Cancer: A Propensity Score Analysis of Two Prospective Cohorts.docx (665.51 kB)
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Table_6_Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 and Colorectal Cancer: A Propensity Score Analysis of Two Prospective Cohorts.docx

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posted on 26.04.2022, 11:36 authored by Heng Li, Yuxue Zhang, Yanlong Liu, Zhangyi Qu, Yupeng Liu, Jiping Qi
Background

Previous researches have shown that the aberrant expression of Metastasis associated in lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) in tumour tissues may serve as a biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis. However, these previous studies have small sample sizes and lacked validation from independent external populations. We therefore aimed to clarify the prognostic value of MALAT1 expression status in CRC patients using a large cohort and validate the findings with another large external cohort.

Methods

The prognostic association between MALAT1 expression status and CRC outcomes was evaluated initially in a prospective cohort in China (n=164) and then validated in an external TCGA population (n=596). In the initial cohort, MALAT1 expression levels were quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Propensity score (PS) adjustment method was used to control potential confounding biases. The prognostic significance was reported as PS-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results

There was no statistically significant association between MALAT1 expression status and CRC patient overall survival (OS) or disease free survival (DFS) in both initial cohort and external validation cohort populations. When combining these populations together, the results did not change materially. The summarized HRPS-adjusted were 1.010 (95% CI, 0.752-1.355, P=0.950) and 1.170 (95% CI, 0.910-1.502, P=0.220) for OS and DFS, respectively.

Conclusions

MALAT1 expression status is not associated with prognostic outcomes of CRC patients. However, additional larger population studies are needed to further validate these findings.

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