Table_4_Highly Recurrent Copy Number Variations in GABRB2 Associated With Schizophrenia and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.xls (68.5 kB)
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Table_4_Highly Recurrent Copy Number Variations in GABRB2 Associated With Schizophrenia and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.xls

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posted on 30.06.2020, 04:31 authored by Ata Ullah, Xi Long, Wai-Kin Mat, Taobo Hu, Muhammad Ismail Khan, Li Hui, Xiangyang Zhang, Peng Sun, Mingzhou Gao, Jieqiong Wang, Haijun Wang, Xia Li, Wenjun Sun, Mingqi Qiao, Hong Xue
Objective

Although single-nucleotide polymorphisms in GABRB2, the gene encoding for GABAA receptors β2 subunit, have been associated with schizophrenia (SCZ), it is unknown whether there is any association of copy number variations (CNVs) in this gene with either SCZ or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Methods

In this study, the occurrences of the recurrent CNVs esv2730987 in Intron 6 and nsv1177513 in Exon 11 of GABRB2 in Chinese and German SCZ, and Chinese PMDD patients were compared to controls of same ethnicity and gender by quantitative PCR (qPCR).

Results

The results demonstrated that copy-number-gains were enriched in both SCZ and PMDD patients with significant odds ratios (OR). For combined-gender SCZ patients versus controls, about two-fold increases were observed in both ethnic groups at both esv2730987 (OR = 2.15, p = 5.32E−4 in Chinese group; OR = 2.79, p = 8.84E−3 in German group) and nsv1177513 (OR = 3.29, p = 1.28E−11 in Chinese group; OR = 2.44, p = 6.17E−5 in German group). The most significant copy-number-gains were observed in Chinese females at nsv1177513 (OR = 3.41), and German females at esv2730987 (OR=3.96). Copy-number-gains were also enriched in Chinese PMDD patients versus controls at esv2730987 (OR = 10.53, p = 4.34E−26) and nsv1177513 (OR = 2.39, p = 3.19E−5).

Conclusion

These findings established for the first time the association of highly recurrent CNVs with SCZ and PMDD, suggesting the presence of an overlapping genetic basis with shared biomarkers for these two common psychiatric disorders.

History

References