Presentation_3_A Critical Role for Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells as Regulators and Therapeutic Targets in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.pdf (1.58 MB)

Presentation_3_A Critical Role for Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells as Regulators and Therapeutic Targets in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.pdf

Download (1.58 MB)
presentation
posted on 29.11.2019 by Goh Murayama, Asako Chiba, Hitoshi Suzuki, Atsushi Nomura, Tomohiro Mizuno, Taiga Kuga, Shinji Nakamura, Hirofumi Amano, Sachiko Hirose, Ken Yamaji, Yusuke Suzuki, Naoto Tamura, Sachiko Miyake

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a subset of innate-like lymphocytes that are restricted by major histocompatibility complex-related molecule 1 (MR1). In this study, we investigated the role of MAIT cells in the pathogenesis of lupus in FcγRIIb−/−Yaa mice, a spontaneous animal model of lupus. Using two approaches of MAIT cell deficiency, MR1 knockout animals and a newly synthesized inhibitory MR1 ligand, we demonstrate that MAIT cells augment the disease course of lupus by enhancing autoantibody production and tissue inflammation. MR1 deficiency reduced germinal center responses and T cell responses in these mice. Suppression of MAIT cell activation by the inhibitory MR1 ligand reduced autoantibody production and lupus nephritis in FcγRIIb−/−Yaa mice. MAIT cells directly enhanced autoantibody production by B cells in vitro. Our results indicate the contribution of MAIT cells to lupus pathology and the potential of these cells as novel therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases such as lupus.

History

References

Licence

Exports