Presentation_1_Estimating Central Pulse Pressure From Blood Flow by Identifying the Main Physical Determinants of Pulse Pressure Amplification.pdf (1.04 MB)
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Presentation_1_Estimating Central Pulse Pressure From Blood Flow by Identifying the Main Physical Determinants of Pulse Pressure Amplification.pdf

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posted on 23.02.2021, 04:56 by Joaquín Flores Gerónimo, Eugenia Corvera Poiré, Philip Chowienczyk, Jordi Alastruey

Several studies suggest that central (aortic) blood pressure (cBP) is a better marker of cardiovascular disease risk than peripheral blood pressure (pBP). The morphology of the pBP wave, usually assessed non-invasively in the arm, differs significantly from the cBP wave, whose direct measurement is highly invasive. In particular, pulse pressure, PP (the amplitude of the pressure wave), increases from central to peripheral arteries, leading to the so-called pulse pressure amplification (ΔPP). The main purpose of this study was to develop a methodology for estimating central PP (cPP) from non-invasive measurements of aortic flow and peripheral PP. Our novel approach is based on a comprehensive understanding of the main cardiovascular properties that determine ΔPP along the aortic-brachial arterial path, namely brachial flow wave morphology in late systole, and vessel radius and distance along this arterial path. This understanding was achieved by using a blood flow model which allows for workable analytical solutions in the frequency domain that can be decoupled and simplified for each arterial segment. Results show the ability of our methodology to (i) capture changes in cPP and ΔPP produced by variations in cardiovascular properties and (ii) estimate cPP with mean differences smaller than 3.3 ± 2.8 mmHg on in silico data for different age groups (25–75 years old) and 5.1 ± 6.9 mmHg on in vivo data for normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Our approach could improve cardiovascular function assessment in clinical cohorts for which aortic flow wave data is available.

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