Video_6_A Ratiometric Calcium Reporter CGf Reveals Calcium Dynamics Both in the Single Cell and Whole Plant Levels Under Heat Stress.AVI (6.16 MB)
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Video_6_A Ratiometric Calcium Reporter CGf Reveals Calcium Dynamics Both in the Single Cell and Whole Plant Levels Under Heat Stress.AVI

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posted on 17.12.2021, 04:25 by Chrystle Weigand, Su-Hwa Kim, Elizabeth Brown, Emily Medina, Moises Mares, Gad Miller, Jeffrey F. Harper, Won-Gyu Choi

Land plants evolved to quickly sense and adapt to temperature changes, such as hot days and cold nights. Given that calcium (Ca2+) signaling networks are implicated in most abiotic stress responses, heat-triggered changes in cytosolic Ca2+ were investigated in Arabidopsis leaves and pollen. Plants were engineered with a reporter called CGf, a ratiometric, genetically encoded Ca2+ reporter with an mCherry reference domain fused to an intensiometric Ca2+ reporter GCaMP6f. Relative changes in [Ca2+]cyt were estimated based on CGf’s apparent KD around 220 nM. The ratiometric output provided an opportunity to compare Ca2+ dynamics between different tissues, cell types, or subcellular locations. In leaves, CGf detected heat-triggered cytosolic Ca2+ signals, comprised of three different signatures showing similarly rapid rates of Ca2+ influx followed by differing rates of efflux (50% durations ranging from 5 to 19 min). These heat-triggered Ca2+ signals were approximately 1.5-fold greater in magnitude than blue light-triggered signals in the same leaves. In contrast, growing pollen tubes showed two different heat-triggered responses. Exposure to heat caused tip-focused steady growth [Ca2+]cyt oscillations to shift to a pattern characteristic of a growth arrest (22%), or an almost undetectable [Ca2+]cyt (78%). Together, these contrasting examples of heat-triggered Ca2+ responses in leaves and pollen highlight the diversity of Ca2+ signals in plants, inviting speculations about their differing kinetic features and biological functions.

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