Video_4_Live-Cell Microscopy Reveals That Human T Cells Primarily Respond Chemokinetically Within a CCL19 Gradient That Induces Chemotaxis in Dendriti.mp4 (8 MB)
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Video_4_Live-Cell Microscopy Reveals That Human T Cells Primarily Respond Chemokinetically Within a CCL19 Gradient That Induces Chemotaxis in Dendritic Cells.mp4

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posted on 26.03.2021, 05:17 authored by Evert J. Loef, Hilary M. Sheppard, Nigel P. Birch, P. Rod Dunbar

The ability to study migratory behavior of immune cells is crucial to understanding the dynamic control of the immune system. Migration induced by chemokines is often assumed to be directional (chemotaxis), yet commonly used end-point migration assays are confounded by detecting increased cell migration that lacks directionality (chemokinesis). To distinguish between chemotaxis and chemokinesis we used the classic “under-agarose assay” in combination with video-microscopy to monitor migration of CCR7+ human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells in response to a concentration gradient of CCL19. Formation of the gradients was visualized with a fluorescent marker and lasted several hours. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells migrated chemotactically towards the CCL19 gradient. In contrast, T cells exhibited a biased random walk that was largely driven by increased exploratory chemokinesis towards CCL19. This dominance of chemokinesis over chemotaxis in T cells is consistent with CCR7 ligation optimizing T cell scanning of antigen-presenting cells in lymphoid tissues.

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