Video_3_Short-Term Fever-Range Hyperthermia Accelerates NETosis and Reduces Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Human Neutrophils.AVI (12.47 MB)

Video_3_Short-Term Fever-Range Hyperthermia Accelerates NETosis and Reduces Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Human Neutrophils.AVI

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posted on 18.10.2019 by Irene A. Keitelman, Florencia Sabbione, Carolina M. Shiromizu, Constanza Giai, Federico Fuentes, David Rosso, Camila Ledo, Maximiliano Miglio Rodriguez, Mauricio Guzman, Jorge R. Geffner, Jeremías Galletti, Carolina Jancic, Marisa I. Gómez, Analía S. Trevani

Fever is a hallmark of infections and inflammatory diseases, represented by an increase of 1–4°C in core body temperature. Fever-range hyperthermia (FRH) has been shown to increase neutrophil recruitment to local sites of infection. Here, we evaluated the impact of a short period (1 h) of FRH (STFRH) on pro-inflammatory and bactericidal human neutrophil functions. STFRH did not affect neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis but reverted the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anti-apoptotic effect compared with that under normothermic conditions. Furthermore, STFRH accelerated phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced NETosis evaluated either by the nuclear DNA decondensation at 2 h post-stimulation or by the increase in extracellular DNA that colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) at 4 h post-stimulation. Increased NETosis upon STFRH was associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production but not in autophagy levels. STFRH also increased NETosis in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge but moderately reduced its phagocytosis. However, these STFRH-induced effects did not influence the ability of neutrophils to kill bacteria after 4 h of co-culture. STFRH also significantly reduced neutrophil capacity to release the pro-inflammatory cytokines chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8/interleukin 8 (CXCL8/IL-8) and IL-1β in response to LPS and P. aeruginosa challenge. Altogether, these results indicate that a short and mild hyperthermal period is enough to modulate neutrophil responses to bacterial encounter. They also suggest that fever spikes during bacterial infections might lead neutrophils to trigger an emergency response promoting neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation to ensnare bacteria in order to wall off the infection and to reduce their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in order to limit the inflammatory response.

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