Video_2_Why Does Child Mortality Decrease With Age? Modeling the Age-Associated Decrease in Mortality Rate Using WHO Metadata From 25 Countries.MP4 (1.33 MB)
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Video_2_Why Does Child Mortality Decrease With Age? Modeling the Age-Associated Decrease in Mortality Rate Using WHO Metadata From 25 Countries.MP4

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posted on 11.08.2021, 05:32 authored by Josef Dolejs, Helena Homolková

Background: Our previous study analyzed the age trajectory of mortality (ATM) in 14 European countries, while this study aimed at investigating ATM in other continents and in countries with a higher level of mortality. Data from 11 Non-European countries were used.

Methods: The number of deaths was extracted from the WHO mortality database. The Halley method was used to calculate the mortality rates in all possible calendar years and all countries combined. This method enables us to combine more countries and more calendar years in one hypothetical population.

Results: The age trajectory of total mortality (ATTM) and also ATM due to specific groups of diseases were very similar in the 11 non-European countries and in the 14 European countries. The level of mortality did not affect the main results found in European countries. The inverse proportion was valid for ATTM in non-European countries with two exceptions.

Slower or no mortality decrease with age was detected in the first year of life, while the inverse proportion model was valid for the age range (1, 10) years in most of the main chapters of ICD10.

Conclusions: The decrease in child mortality with age may be explained as the result of the depletion of individuals with congenital impairment. The majority of deaths up to the age of 10 years were related to congenital impairments, and the decrease in child mortality rate with age was a demonstration of population heterogeneity. The congenital impairments were latent and may cause death even if no congenital impairment was detected.

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