Frontiers
Browse
Video_1_Investigation of the Sense of Agency in Social Cognition, Based on Frameworks of Predictive Coding and Active Inference: A Simulation Study on.MP4 (18.04 MB)

Video_1_Investigation of the Sense of Agency in Social Cognition, Based on Frameworks of Predictive Coding and Active Inference: A Simulation Study on Multimodal Imitative Interaction.MP4

Download (18.04 MB)
media
posted on 2020-09-07, 15:32 authored by Wataru Ohata, Jun Tani

When agents interact socially with different intentions (or wills), conflicts are difficult to avoid. Although the means by which social agents can resolve such problems autonomously has not been determined, dynamic characteristics of agency may shed light on underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the current study focused on the sense of agency, a specific aspect of agency referring to congruence between the agent's intention in acting and the outcome, especially in social interaction contexts. Employing predictive coding and active inference as theoretical frameworks of perception and action generation, we hypothesize that regulation of complexity in the evidence lower bound of an agent's model should affect the strength of the agent's sense of agency and should have a significant impact on social interactions. To evaluate this hypothesis, we built a computational model of imitative interaction between a robot and a human via visuo-proprioceptive sensation with a variational Bayes recurrent neural network, and simulated the model in the form of pseudo-imitative interaction using recorded human body movement data, which serve as the counterpart in the interactions. A key feature of the model is that the complexity of each modality can be regulated differently by changing the values of a hyperparameter assigned to each local module of the model. We first searched for an optimal setting of hyperparameters that endow the model with appropriate coordination of multimodal sensation. These searches revealed that complexity of the vision module should be more tightly regulated than that of the proprioception module because of greater uncertainty in visual information flow. Using this optimally trained model as a default model, we investigated how changing the tightness of complexity regulation in the entire network after training affects the strength of the sense of agency during imitative interactions. The results showed that with looser regulation of complexity, an agent tends to act more egocentrically, without adapting to the other. In contrast, with tighter regulation, the agent tends to follow the other by adjusting its intention. We conclude that the tightness of complexity regulation significantly affects the strength of the sense of agency and the dynamics of interactions between agents in social settings.

History