Video_1_Bridging the Transient Intraluminal Stroke Preclinical Model to Clinical Practice: From Improved Surgical Procedures to a Workflow of Function.MP4 (5.75 MB)
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Video_1_Bridging the Transient Intraluminal Stroke Preclinical Model to Clinical Practice: From Improved Surgical Procedures to a Workflow of Functional Tests.MP4

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posted on 11.03.2022, 05:42 authored by Raquel Pinto, Ana Magalhães, Mafalda Sousa, Lúcia Melo, Andrea Lobo, Pedro Barros, João R. Gomes

Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) remains a leading cause of mortality, despite significant advances in therapy (endovascular thrombectomy). Failure in developing novel effective therapies is associated with unsuccessful translation from preclinical studies to clinical practice, associated to inconsistent and highly variable infarct areas and lack of relevant post-stroke functional evaluation in preclinical research. To outreach these limitations, we optimized the intraluminal transient middle cerebral occlusion, a widely used mouse stroke model, in two key parameters, selection of appropriate occlusion filaments and time of occlusion, which show a significant variation in the literature. We demonstrate that commercially available filaments with short coating length (1–2 mm), together with 45-min occlusion, results in a consistent affected brain region, similar to what is observed in most patients with AIS. Importantly, a dedicated post-stroke care protocol, based on clinical practice applied to patients who had stroke, resulted in lower mortality and improved mice welfare. Finally, a battery of tests covering relevant fine motor skills, sensory functions, and learning/memory behaviors revealed a significant effect of tMCAO brain infarction, which is parallel to patient symptomatology as measured by relevant clinical scales (NIH Stroke Scale, NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale, mRS). Thus, in order to enhance translation to clinical practice, future preclinical stroke research must consider the methodology described in this study, which includes improved reproducible surgical procedure, postoperative care, and the battery of functional tests. This will be a major step s closing the gap from bench to bedside, rendering the development of novel effective therapeutic approaches.

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