Video_1_A Novel Dynamic Morphed Stimuli Set to Assess Sensitivity to Identity and Emotion Attributes in Faces.MP4 (36.31 kB)

Video_1_A Novel Dynamic Morphed Stimuli Set to Assess Sensitivity to Identity and Emotion Attributes in Faces.MP4

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posted on 09.04.2019, 05:23 by Hayley Darke, Simon J. Cropper, Olivia Carter

Face-based tasks are used ubiquitously in the study of human perception and cognition. Video-based (dynamic) face stimuli are increasingly utilized by researchers because they have higher ecological validity than static images. However, there are few ready-to-use dynamic stimulus sets currently available to researchers that include non-emotional and non-face control stimuli. This paper outlines the development of three original dynamic stimulus sets: a set of emotional faces (fear and disgust), a set of non-emotional faces, and a set of car animations. Morphing software was employed to vary the intensity of the expression shown and to vary the similarity between actors. Manipulating these dimensions permits us to create tasks of varying difficulty that can be optimized to detect more subtle differences in face-processing ability. Using these new stimuli, two preliminary experiments were conducted to evaluate different aspects of facial identity recognition, emotion recognition, and non-face object discrimination. Results suggest that these five different tasks successfully avoided floor and ceiling effects in a healthy sample. A second experiment found that dynamic versions of the emotional stimuli were recognized more accurately than static versions, both for labeling, and discrimination paradigms. This indicates that, like previous emotion-only stimuli sets, the use of dynamic stimuli confers an advantage over image-based stimuli. These stimuli therefore provide a useful resource for researchers looking to investigate both emotional and non-emotional face-processing using dynamic stimuli. Moreover, these stimuli vary across crucial dimensions (i.e., face similarity and intensity of emotion) which allows researchers to modify task difficulty as required.

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