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Video_1_A Microfluidic System for Studying the Effects of Disturbed Flow on Endothelial Cells.MP4 (4.87 MB)

Video_1_A Microfluidic System for Studying the Effects of Disturbed Flow on Endothelial Cells.MP4

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posted on 2019-04-17, 04:08 authored by Francisco Tovar-Lopez, Peter Thurgood, Christopher Gilliam, Ngan Nguyen, Elena Pirogova, Khashayar Khoshmanesh, Sara Baratchi

Arterial endothelium experience physical stress associated with blood flow and play a central role in maintaining vascular integrity and homeostasis in response to hemodynamic forces. Blood flow within vessels is generally laminar and streamlined. However, abrupt changes in the vessel geometry due to branching, sharp turns or stenosis can disturb the laminar blood flow, causing secondary flows in the form of vortices. Such disturbed flow patterns activate pro-inflammatory phenotypes in endothelial cells, damaging the endothelial layer and can lead to atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Here, we report a microfluidic system with integrated ridge-shaped obstacles for generating controllable disturbed flow patterns. This system is used to study the effect of disturbed flow on the cytoskeleton remodeling and nuclear shape and size of cultured human aortic endothelial cells. Our results demonstrate that the generated disturbed flow changes the orientation angle of actin stress fibers and reduces the nuclear size while increases the nuclear circularity.

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