Video4_Using Light-Sheet Microscopy to Study Spontaneous Activity in the Developing Lateral-Line System.MP4 (218.31 kB)
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Video4_Using Light-Sheet Microscopy to Study Spontaneous Activity in the Developing Lateral-Line System.MP4

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posted on 20.04.2022, 04:23 authored by Qiuxiang Zhang, Katie S. Kindt

Hair cells are the sensory receptors in the auditory and vestibular systems of all vertebrates, and in the lateral-line system of aquatic vertebrates. The purpose of this work is to explore the zebrafish lateral-line system as a model to study and understand spontaneous activity in vivo. Our work applies genetically encoded calcium indicators along with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy to visualize spontaneous calcium activity in the developing lateral-line system. Consistent with our previous work, we show that spontaneous calcium activity is present in developing lateral-line hair cells. We now show that supporting cells that surround hair cells, and cholinergic efferent terminals that directly contact hair cells are also spontaneously active. Using two-color functional imaging we demonstrate that spontaneous activity in hair cells does not correlate with activity in either supporting cells or cholinergic terminals. We find that during lateral-line development, hair cells autonomously generate spontaneous events. Using localized calcium indicators, we show that within hair cells, spontaneous calcium activity occurs in two distinct domains—the mechanosensory bundle and the presynapse. Further, spontaneous activity in the mechanosensory bundle ultimately drives spontaneous calcium influx at the presynapse. Comprehensively, our results indicate that in developing lateral-line hair cells, autonomously generated spontaneous activity originates with spontaneous mechanosensory events.

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