Video1_Using a Digital Twin of an Electrical Stimulation Device to Monitor and Control the Electrical Stimulation of Cells in vitro.FLV (602.55 kB)
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Video1_Using a Digital Twin of an Electrical Stimulation Device to Monitor and Control the Electrical Stimulation of Cells in vitro.FLV

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posted on 08.12.2021, 04:57 authored by Julius Zimmermann, Kai Budde, Nils Arbeiter, Francia Molina, Alexander Storch, Adelinde M. Uhrmacher, Ursula van Rienen

Electrical stimulation for application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine has received increasing attention in recent years. A variety of stimulation methods, waveforms and amplitudes have been studied. However, a clear choice of optimal stimulation parameters is still not available and is complicated by ambiguous reporting standards. In order to understand underlying cellular mechanisms affected by the electrical stimulation, the knowledge of the actual prevailing field strength or current density is required. Here, we present a comprehensive digital representation, a digital twin, of a basic electrical stimulation device for the electrical stimulation of cells in vitro. The effect of electrochemical processes at the electrode surface was experimentally characterised and integrated into a numerical model of the electrical stimulation. Uncertainty quantification techniques were used to identify the influence of model uncertainties on relevant observables. Different stimulation protocols were compared and it was assessed if the information contained in the monitored stimulation pulses could be related to the stimulation model. We found that our approach permits to model and simulate the recorded rectangular waveforms such that local electric field strengths become accessible. Moreover, we could predict stimulation voltages and currents reliably. This enabled us to define a controlled stimulation setting and to identify significant temperature changes of the cell culture in the monitored voltage data. Eventually, we give an outlook on how the presented methods can be applied in more complex situations such as the stimulation of hydrogels or tissue in vivo.

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