Image_8_Predicting Panel of Metabolism and Immune-Related Genes for the Prognosis of Human Ovarian Cancer.TIF (1.37 MB)
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posted on 12.07.2021, 05:36 authored by Lingyun Zhang, Wenwen Sun, Weimin Ren, Jinguo Zhang, Guoxiong Xu
Objective

Ovarian cancer (OC) is a high deadly gynecologic cancer with a poor prognosis. The identification of genomic aberrations could predict the clinical prognosis of OC patients and may eventually develop new therapeutic strategies in the future. The purpose of this study is to create comprehensive co-expressed gene networks correlated with metabolism and the immune process of OC.

Methods

The transcriptome profiles of TCGA OC datasets and GSE26193 datasets were analyzed. The mRNA expression level, hub genomic alteration, patient’s survival status, and tumor cell immune microenvironment of metabolism-related genes were analyzed from TCGA, GTEX, Oncomine, Kaplan-Meier Plotter, cBioPortal, TIMER, ESTIMATE, and CIBERSORT databases. We further validated the mRNA and protein expression levels of these hub genes in OC cell lines and tissues using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.

Results

The LASSO-Cox regression analyses unveiled seven differently expressed metabolism-related genes, including GFPT2, DGKD, ACACB, ACSM3, IDO1, TPMT, and PGP. The Cox regression risk model could be served as an independent marker to predict the overall clinical survival of OC patients. The expression of GFPT2, DGKD, ACACB, and ACSM3 were downregulated in OC tissues, while IDO1, TPMT, and PGP were upregulated in OC tissues than in control. Moreover, DGKD and IDO1 were significantly associated with the human immune system.

Conclusion

The differently expressed metabolism-related genes were identified to be a risk model in the prediction of the prognosis of OC. The identified hub genes related to OC prognosis may play important roles in influencing both human metabolism and the immune system.

History

References