Image_7_Identification of Genes Linking Natural Killer Cells to Apoptosis in Acute Myocardial Infarction and Ischemic Stroke.tif (949.2 kB)
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posted on 01.04.2022, 04:44 authored by Lele Feng, Ruofei Tian, Xingdou Mu, Cheng Chen, Yuxi Zhang, Jun Cui, Yujie Song, Yingying Liu, Miao Zhang, Lei Shi, Yang Sun, Ling Li, Wei Yi

Natural killer (NK) cells are a type of innate lymphoid cell that are involved in the progression of acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Although multiple forms of programmed cell death are known to play important roles in these diseases, the correlation between NK cells and apoptosis-related genes during acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke remains unclear. In this study, we explored the distinct patterns of NK cell infiltration and apoptosis during the pathological progression of acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke using mRNA expression microarrays from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Since the abundance of NK cells correlated positively with apoptosis in both diseases, we further examined the correlation between NK cell abundance and the expression of apoptosis-related genes. Interestingly, APAF1 and IRAK3 expression correlated negatively with NK cell abundance in both acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, whereas ATM, CAPN1, IL1B, IL1R1, PRKACA, PRKACB, and TNFRSF1A correlated negatively with NK cell abundance in acute myocardial infarction. Together, these findings suggest that these apoptosis-related genes may play important roles in the mechanisms underlying the patterns of NK cell abundance and apoptosis in acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Our study, therefore, provides novel insights for the further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanism of ischemic injury in both the heart and the brain, as well as potential useful therapeutic targets.

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