Image_6_Alterations in Degree Centrality and Functional Connectivity in Parkinson’s Disease Patients With Freezing of Gait: A Resting-State Functional.JPEG (2.4 MB)
Download file

Image_6_Alterations in Degree Centrality and Functional Connectivity in Parkinson’s Disease Patients With Freezing of Gait: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.JPEG

Download (2.4 MB)
figure
posted on 03.11.2020, 04:35 by MiaoRan Guo, Yan Ren, HongMei Yu, HuaGuang Yang, ChengHao Cao, YingMei Li, GuoGuang Fan
Objective

Freezing of gait (FOG) is a common disabling motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the potential pathogenic mechanisms are still unclear.

Methods

A total of 22 patients with PD with FOG (PD-FOG), 28 patients with PD without FOG (PD-nFOG), and 33 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited in this study. Degree centrality (DC)—a graph theory-based measurement of global connectivity at the voxel level by measuring the number of instantaneous functional connections between one region and the rest of the brain—can map brain hubs with high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. DC was used to explore alterations in the centrality of PD-FOG correlated with brain node levels. PD-FOG cognitive network dysfunction was further revealed via a seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analysis. In addition, correlation analyses were carried out between clinical symptoms and acquired connectivity measurement.

Results

Compared to the PD-nFOG group, the PD-FOG group showed remarkably increased DC values in the right middle frontal gyrus (RMFG). There were no significant differences in other gray matter regions. Importantly, the clinical severity of FOG was related to the mean DC values in the RMFG. This brain region served as a seed in secondary seed-based FC analysis, and we further found FC changes in the right precuneus, right inferior frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and cerebellum.

Conclusion

Increased RMFG activity and FC network alterations in the middle frontal cortex with the precuneus, inferior, and SFG, and the cerebellum may have great potential in brain dysfunction in PD with FOG.

History

References