Image_5_Vitis vinifera L. Diversity for Cations and Acidity Is Suitable for Breeding Fruits Coping With Climate Warming.jpeg (1.55 MB)

Image_5_Vitis vinifera L. Diversity for Cations and Acidity Is Suitable for Breeding Fruits Coping With Climate Warming.jpeg

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posted on 22.09.2020 by Antoine Bigard, Charles Romieu, Yannick Sire, Laurent Torregrosa

The selection of grapevine varieties is considered to be the smartest strategy for adapting the viticulture to climate warming. Present knowledge of the diversity of grape solutes known to be influenced by temperature is too limited to perform genetic improvement strategies. This study aimed to characterize the diversity for major cations (K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, NH4+) of the Vitis vinifera fruit and their effect on acidity. Two developmental stages were targeted: the end of green growth, when organic acids reach a maximum, and the physiological ripe stage defined by the stopping of solutes and water import at the maximum volume of the berry. Twelve varieties and 21 microvines from the same segregating population were selected from preliminary phenotyping. The concentration of cations depended on the stage of fruit development, the genotype and the environment with GxE effects. In the ripe grape, K+ concentration varied from 28 to 57 mmol.L-1 with other cations being less concentrated. Combined with the variation in organic acids, cation concentration diversity resulted in titratable acidity of the ripe fruit ranging from 38 to 215 meq.L-1. These results open new perspectives for the selection of varieties to mitigate the adverse effects of climate warming on grape quality.

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