Image_5_Association Between Environmental Factors and Asthma Using Mendelian Randomization: Increased Effect of Body Mass Index on Adult-Onset Moderat.TIF (201.01 kB)
Download file

Image_5_Association Between Environmental Factors and Asthma Using Mendelian Randomization: Increased Effect of Body Mass Index on Adult-Onset Moderate-to-Severe Asthma Subtypes.TIF

Download (201.01 kB)
figure
posted on 20.05.2021, 04:57 authored by Tae-Woong Ha, Hae-Un Jung, Dong Jun Kim, Eun Ju Baek, Won Jun Lee, Ji Eun Lim, Han Kyul Kim, Ji-One Kang, Bermseok Oh

Although asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases throughout all age groups, its etiology remains unknown, primarily due to its heterogeneous characteristics. We examined the causal effects of various environmental factors on asthma using Mendelian randomization and determined whether the susceptibility to asthma due to the causal effect of a risk factor differs between asthma subtypes, based on age of onset, severity of asthma, and sex. We performed Mendelian randomization analyses (inverse variance weighted, weighted median, and generalized summary-data-based Mendelian randomization) using UK Biobank data to estimate the causal effects of 69 environmental factors on asthma. Additional sensitivity analyses (MR-Egger regression, Cochran’s Q test, clumping, and reverse Mendelian randomization) were performed to ensure minimal or no pleiotropy. For confirmation, two-sample setting analyses were replicated using BMI SNPs that had been reported by a meta-genome-wide association study in Japanese and European (GIANT) populations and a genome-wide association study in control individuals from the UK Biobank. We found that BMI causally affects the development of asthma and that the adult-onset moderate-to-severe asthma subtype is the most susceptible to causal inference by BMI. Further, it is likely that the female subtype is more susceptible to BMI than males among adult asthma cases. Our findings provide evidence that obesity is a considerable risk factor in asthma patients, particularly in adult-onset moderate-to-severe asthma cases, and that weight loss is beneficial for reducing the burden of asthma.

History

References