Image_4_Variation of Serum Uric Acid Is Associated With Gut Microbiota in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus.tif (212.37 kB)
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posted on 18.01.2022, 04:08 authored by Weifeng Zhang, Ting Wang, Ruixue Guo, Wen Cui, Wei Yu, Zhihui Wang, Yumin Jiang, Minghan Jiang, Xiaojie Wang, Chao Liu, Jing Xiao, Jin Shang, Xuejun Wen, Zhanzheng Zhao

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease closely related to a disordered gut microbiome. Diabetic patients usually suffer from various metabolic disorders, such as increased serum uric acid levels. Although serum uric acid levels depend partially on intestine excretion, the relationship between uric acid and gut microbiome in diabetic patients remains unknown. We collected a total of 126 fecal samples from diabetic patients for 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing and recorded clinical data. We analyzed the correlation between clinical indicators and gut microbiota of diabetic patients using Spearman analysis. Since uric acid was the most prominent one, we classified diabetic patients based on their uric acid levels to find the microbiome associated with uric acid disturbance. We constructed Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway profiles using Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt) to identify variations between the different groups. Among all the clinical indicators, uric acid had the strongest correlation with gut microbiota. First, we divided the patients into three groups according to their uric acid levels. The two low uric acid groups were similar, while the elevated uric acid group had significant differences in gut microbiota and metabolic pathways. The elevated uric acid group had a significantly lower gut microbiota diversity. At the genus level, this group had remarkably higher Escherichia–Shigella amounts and notably lower Faecalibacterium, Oscillospiraceae_UCG−002, and Oscillospiraceae_UCG−005 amounts. The gut microbiota of the high uric acid group was predicted to be enriched in metabolism, human diseases, and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Since the two low uric acid groups were similar, we regrouped and matched the abnormal uric acid patients with normal uric acid patients. The differences in gut microbiota and metabolic pathways related to nucleotide metabolism became more significant. The serum uric acid levels were associated with gut microbiome changes. This might be related to uric acid metabolism by gut microbes. Our study indicates that targeting the gut microbiome could help manage elevated uric acid levels.

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