Image_4_Transcriptome Analysis Revealed the Molecular Response Mechanism of Non-heading Chinese Cabbage to Iron Deficiency Stress.JPEG (157.15 kB)
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Image_4_Transcriptome Analysis Revealed the Molecular Response Mechanism of Non-heading Chinese Cabbage to Iron Deficiency Stress.JPEG

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posted on 14.03.2022, 11:32 authored by Jingping Yuan, Daohan Li, Changwei Shen, Chunhui Wu, Nadeem Khan, Feifei Pan, Helian Yang, Xin Li, Weili Guo, Bihua Chen, Xinzheng Li

Iron is a trace metal that is found in animals, plants, and the human body. Human iron absorption is hampered by plant iron shortage, which leads to anemia. Leafy vegetables are one of the most direct and efficient sources of iron for humans. Despite the fact that ferrotrophic disorder is common in calcareous soil, however, non-heading Chinese cabbage performs a series of reactions in response to iron deficiency stress that help to preserve iron homeostasis in vivo. In this study, we discovered that iron deficiency stress caused leaf yellowing and impeded plant development in both iron-deficient and control treatments by viewing or measuring phenotypic, chlorophyll content, and Fe2+ content in both iron-deficient and control treatments. We found a total of 9213 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in non-heading Chinese cabbage by comparing root and leaf transcriptome data with iron deficiency and control treatments. For instance, 1927 DEGs co-expressed in root and leaf, including 897 up-regulated and 1030 down-regulated genes, respectively. We selected some key antioxidant genes, hormone signal transduction, iron absorption and transport, chlorophyll metabolism, and transcription factors involved in the regulation of iron deficiency stress utilizing GO enrichment, KEGG enrichment, multiple types of functional annotation, and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA). This study identifies prospective genes for maintaining iron homeostasis under iron-deficient stress, offering a theoretical foundation for further research into the molecular mechanisms of greater adaptation to iron-deficient stress, and perhaps guiding the development of iron-tolerant varieties.

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