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posted on 12.04.2022, 08:05 by Sina Hosseinian, Kathleen Powers, Milind Vasudev, Anton M. Palma, Rafael de Assis, Aarti Jain, Peter Horvath, Paramveer S. Birring, Rana Andary, Connie Au, Brandon Chin, Ghali Khalil, Jenny Ventura, Madeleine K. Luu, Cesar Figueroa, Joshua M. Obiero, Emily Silzel, Rie Nakajima, William Thomas Gombrich, Algis Jasinskas, Frank Zaldivar, Sebastian Schubl, Philip L. Felgner, Saahir Khan, The Specimen Collection Group

Recent studies provide conflicting evidence on the persistence of SARS-CoV-2 immunity induced by mRNA vaccines. Here, we aim to quantify the persistence of humoral immunity following vaccination using a coronavirus antigen microarray that includes 10 SARS-CoV-2 antigens. In a prospective longitudinal cohort of 240 healthcare workers, composite SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody levels did not wane significantly over a 6-month study period. In the subset of the study population previously exposed to SARS-CoV-2 based on seropositivity for nucleocapsid antibodies, higher composite anti-spike IgG levels were measured before the vaccine but no significant difference from unexposed individuals was observed at 6 months. Age, vaccine type, or worker role did not significantly impact composite IgG levels, although non-significant trends towards lower antibody levels in older participants and higher antibody levels with Moderna vaccine were observed at 6 months. A small subset of our cohort were classified as having waning antibody titers at 6 months, and these individuals were less likely to work in patient care roles and more likely to have prior exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

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