Image_4_New Estimation of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Sediment Along the Haihe River and Bohai Bay in China: A Comparison Between Single and Succes.JPEG (437.12 kB)
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Image_4_New Estimation of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Sediment Along the Haihe River and Bohai Bay in China: A Comparison Between Single and Successive DNA Extraction Methods.JPEG

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posted on 20.09.2021, 04:38 by Chao Wu, Guicheng Zhang, Wenzhe Xu, Shan Jian, Liyin Peng, Dai Jia, Jun Sun

Sediment is thought to be a vital reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Often, studies describing and comparing ARGs and their potential hosts in sediment are based on single DNA extractions. To date, however, no study has been conducted to assess the influence of DNA extraction efficiency on ARGs in sediment. To determine whether the abundance of ARGs is underestimated, we performed five successive extraction cycles with a widely used commercial kit in 10 sediment samples collected from the Haihe River and Bohai Bay. Our results showed that accumulated DNA yields after five extractions were 1.8–3.1 times higher than that by single DNA extractions. High-throughput sequencing showed that insufficient DNA extraction could generate PCR bias and skew community structure characterization in sediment. The relative abundances of some pathogenic bacteria, such as Enterobacteriales, Lactobacillales, and Streptomycetales, were significantly different between single and successive DNA extraction samples. In addition, real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that ARGs, intI1, and 16S rRNA gene abundance strongly increased with increasing extraction cycles. Among the measured ARGs, sulfonamide resistance genes and multidrug resistance genes were dominant subtypes in the study region. Nevertheless, different subtypes of ARGs did not respond equally to the additional extraction cycles; some continued to have linear growth trends, and some tended to level off. Additionally, more correlations between ARGs and bacterial communities were observed in the successive DNA extraction samples than in the single DNA extraction samples. It is suggested that 3–4 additional extraction cycles are required in future studies when extracting DNA from sediment samples. Taken together, our results highlight that performing successive DNA extractions on sediment samples optimizes the extractable DNA yield and can lead to a better picture of the abundance of ARGs and their potential hosts in sediments.

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