Image_4_Inflammasome Deletion Promotes Anti-tumor NK Cell Function in an IL-1/IL-18 Independent Way in Murine Invasive Breast Cancer.pdf (570 kB)

Image_4_Inflammasome Deletion Promotes Anti-tumor NK Cell Function in an IL-1/IL-18 Independent Way in Murine Invasive Breast Cancer.pdf

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posted on 16.09.2020, 13:28 by Baptiste Guey, Mélanie Bodnar-Wachtel, Annabelle Drouillard, Anaïs Eberhardt, Manon Pratviel, Nadège Goutagny, Nathalie Bendriss-Vermare, Isabelle Puisieux, Christophe Caux, Thierry Walzer, Virginie Petrilli

Inflammasomes are molecular complexes that trigger an inflammatory response upon detection of pathogens or danger signals. Recent studies suggest that they are also involved in cancer progression. However, their roles during tumorigenesis remain poorly understood and controversial. Here, we investigated whether inflammasome activation supports mammary tumor growth. Using mouse models of invasive breast cancer, our results demonstrate that the absence of a functional inflammasome impairs tumor growth. Importantly, tumors implanted into inflammasome-deficient mice recruited significantly less neutrophils and more natural killer (NK) cells, and these latter cells displayed a more active phenotype. Interestingly, NK cell depletion abolished the anti-tumoral effect observed in inflammasome-deficient mice, although inflammasome-regulated cytokine neutralization had no effect. Thus, our work identifies a novel role for the inflammasome in supporting mammary tumor growth by attenuating NK cell recruitment and activity. These results suggest that inflammasome inhibition could be a putative target for treating invasive breast cancers.

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