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posted on 09.02.2021, 04:52 authored by Zsuzsa Bartos, László Homolya

Proper targeting of the urate and xenobiotic transporter ATP-binding transporter subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) to the plasma membrane (PM) is essential for its normal function. The naturally occurring Q141K and M71V polymorphisms in ABCG2, associated with gout and hyperuricemia, affect the cellular routing of the transporter, rather than its transport function. The cellular localization of ABCG2 variants was formerly studied by immunolabeling, which provides information only on the steady-state distribution of the protein, leaving the dynamics of its cellular routing unexplored. In the present study, we assessed in detail the trafficking of the wild-type, M71V-, and Q141K-ABCG2 variants from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface using a dynamic approach, the so-called Retention Using Selective Hooks (RUSH) system. This method also allowed us to study the kinetics of glycosylation of these variants. We found that the fraction of Q141K- and M71V-ABCG2 that passes the ER quality control system is only partially targeted to the PM; a subfraction is immobile and retained in the ER. Surprisingly, the transit of these variants through the Golgi apparatus (either the appearance or the exit) was unaffected; however, their PM delivery beyond the Golgi was delayed. In addition to identifying the specific defects in the trafficking of these ABCG2 variants, our study provides a novel experimental tool for studying the effect of drugs that potentially promote the cell surface delivery of mutant or polymorphic ABCG2 variants with impaired trafficking.

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