Image_3_Syndecan-4 Modulates Cell Polarity and Migration by Influencing Centrosome Positioning and Intracellular Calcium Distribution.png (18.87 MB)
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Image_3_Syndecan-4 Modulates Cell Polarity and Migration by Influencing Centrosome Positioning and Intracellular Calcium Distribution.png

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posted on 15.10.2020, 05:09 authored by Daniel Becsky, Kitti Szabo, Szuzina Gyulai-Nagy, Tamas Gajdos, Zsuzsa Bartos, Arpad Balind, Laszlo Dux, Peter Horvath, Miklos Erdelyi, Laszlo Homolya, Aniko Keller-Pinter

Efficient cell migration requires cellular polarization, which is characterized by the formation of leading and trailing edges, appropriate positioning of the nucleus and reorientation of the Golgi apparatus and centrosomes toward the leading edge. Migration also requires the development of an asymmetrical front-to-rear calcium (Ca2+) gradient to regulate focal adhesion assembly and actomyosin contractility. Here we demonstrate that silencing of syndecan-4, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, interferes with the correct polarization of migrating mammalian myoblasts (i.e., activated satellite stem cells). In particular, syndecan-4 knockdown completely abolished the intracellular Ca2+ gradient, abrogated centrosome reorientation and thus decreased cell motility, demonstrating the role of syndecan-4 in cell polarity. Additionally, syndecan-4 exhibited a polarized distribution during migration. Syndecan-4 knockdown cells exhibited decreases in the total movement distance during directional migration, maximum and vectorial distances from the starting point, as well as average and maximum cell speeds. Super-resolution direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images of syndecan-4 knockdown cells revealed nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeletal architecture, such as decreases in the numbers of branches and individual branch lengths in the lamellipodia of the migrating cells. Given the crucial importance of myoblast migration during embryonic development and postnatal muscle regeneration, we conclude that our results could facilitate an understanding of these processes and the general role of syndecan-4 during cell migration.

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