Image_3_Salinity Tolerance in a Synthetic Allotetraploid Wheat (SlSlAA) Is Similar to Its Higher Tolerant Parent Aegilops longissima (SlSl) and Linked.TIF (308.67 kB)
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Image_3_Salinity Tolerance in a Synthetic Allotetraploid Wheat (SlSlAA) Is Similar to Its Higher Tolerant Parent Aegilops longissima (SlSl) and Linked to Flavonoids Metabolism.TIF

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posted on 17.03.2022, 05:15 authored by Tiansi Fu, Chenyang Xu, Hong Li, Xiaohan Wu, Man Tang, Binbin Xiao, Ruili Lv, Zhibin Zhang, Xiang Gao, Bao Liu, Chunwu Yang

Allotetraploidization between A and S (closely related to B) genome species led to the speciation of allotetraploid wheat (genome BBAA). However, the immediate metabolic outcomes and adaptive changes caused by the allotetraploidization event are poorly understood. Here, we investigated how allotetraploidization affected salinity tolerance using a synthetic allotetraploid wheat line (genome SlSlAA, labeled as 4x), its Aegilops longissima (genome SlSl, labeled as SlSl) and Triticum urartu (AA genome, labeled as AA) parents. We found that the degree of salinity tolerance of 4x was similar to its SlSl parent, and both were substantially more tolerant to salinity stress than AA. This suggests that the SlSl subgenome exerts a dominant effect for this trait in 4x. Compared with SlSl and 4x, the salinity-stressed AA plants did not accumulate a higher concentration of Na+ in leaves, but showed severe membrane peroxidation and accumulated a higher concentration of ROS (H2O2 and O2⋅⁣–) and a lesser concentration of flavonoids, indicating that ROS metabolism plays a key role in saline sensitivity. Exogenous flavonoid application to roots of AA plants significantly relieved salinity-caused injury. Our results suggest that the higher accumulation of flavonoids in SlSl may contribute to ROS scavenging and salinity tolerance, and these physiological properties were stably inherited by the nascent allotetraploid SlSlAA.

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