Image_3_Live Virus Neutralisation of the 501Y.V1 and 501Y.V2 SARS-CoV-2 Variants following INO-4800 Vaccination of Ferrets.tiff (2.72 MB)
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Image_3_Live Virus Neutralisation of the 501Y.V1 and 501Y.V2 SARS-CoV-2 Variants following INO-4800 Vaccination of Ferrets.tiff

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posted on 25.06.2021, 13:51 authored by Shane Riddell, Sarah Goldie, Alexander J. McAuley, Michael J. Kuiper, Peter A. Durr, Kim R. Blasdell, Mary Tachedjian, Julian D. Druce, Trevor R. F. Smith, Kate E. Broderick, Seshadri S. Vasan

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant global morbidity and mortality on a scale similar to the influenza pandemic of 1918. Over the course of the last few months, a number of SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified against which vaccine-induced immune responses may be less effective. These “variants-of-concern” have garnered significant attention in the media, with discussion around their impact on the future of the pandemic and the ability of leading COVID-19 vaccines to protect against them effectively. To address concerns about emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants affecting vaccine-induced immunity, we investigated the neutralisation of representative ‘G614’, ‘501Y.V1’ and ‘501Y.V2’ virus isolates using sera from ferrets that had received prime-boost doses of the DNA vaccine, INO-4800. Neutralisation titres against G614 and 501Y.V1 were comparable, but titres against the 501Y.V2 variant were approximately 4-fold lower, similar to results reported with other nucleic acid vaccines and supported by in silico biomolecular modelling. The results confirm that the vaccine-induced neutralising antibodies generated by INO-4800 remain effective against current variants-of-concern, albeit with lower neutralisation titres against 501Y.V2 similar to other leading nucleic acid-based vaccines.

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