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posted on 16.11.2021, 04:27 by Jie Qian, Weimin Wang, Lin Wang, Jun Lu, Lele Zhang, Bo Zhang, Shuyuan Wang, Wei Nie, Yanwei Zhang, Yuqing Lou, Baohui Han
Background

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequent comorbidity in patients with cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with DM and to assess whether an optimal glycemic control improves overall survival (OS).

Methods

A total of 1279 advanced NSCLC patients including 300 (23.5%) with preexisting DM were retrospectively reviewed. The continuous relationship between glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) level and OS was analyzed by restricted cubic spline (RCS) function. Optimal HbA1c cut-off point was determined using X-tile analysis. Survival was analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared among groups stratified by diabetes status and HbA1c. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was employed to identify prognostic factors for OS after adjusting for baseline characteristics.

Results

DM and non-DM patients had similar OS (median (95% CI): 22.85 (20.05-26.73) vs. 22.22 (20.35-24.76) months, P=0.950). The multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that DM status was not a prognostic factor for OS (HR: 0.952, 95% CI: 0.808-1.122, P=0.559). However, there existed a non-linear but generally positive relationship between the elevated HbA1c level and increased risk of overall mortality. HbA1c > 6.6% was a negative prognostic factor for OS (HR: 1.593, 95% CI: 1.113-2.280, P=0.011). The median OS (95% CI) for nondiabetic patients, DM patients with HbA1c ≤6.6% and those with HbA1c > 6.6% was 22.22 (20.01-24.43), 25.28 (21.79-28.77) and 15.45 (7.57-23.33) months, respectively. Well-controlled DM patients had a comparable crude OS (HR (95% CI): 0.90 (0.76-1.08), P=0.273] compared to nondiabetic patients while patients with HbA1c>6.6% had a worse crude OS than patients without DM (HR (95% CI): 1.70 (1.24-2.34), P=0.001]. The survival benefit of good HbA1c control was prominent in all subgroups.

Conclusion

Impaired glycemic level negatively affects survival for patients with advanced NSCLC while proper glycemic control with HbA1c ≤6.6% improves the OS.

History

References