Image_2_Simultaneous Two-Photon Voltage or Calcium Imaging and Multi-Channel Local Field Potential Recordings in Barrel Cortex of Awake and Anesthetiz.TIF (248.42 kB)
Download file

Image_2_Simultaneous Two-Photon Voltage or Calcium Imaging and Multi-Channel Local Field Potential Recordings in Barrel Cortex of Awake and Anesthetized Mice.TIF

Download (248.42 kB)
figure
posted on 11.11.2021, 15:17 by Claudia Cecchetto, Stefano Vassanelli, Bernd Kuhn

Neuronal population activity, both spontaneous and sensory-evoked, generates propagating waves in cortex. However, high spatiotemporal-resolution mapping of these waves is difficult as calcium imaging, the work horse of current imaging, does not reveal subthreshold activity. Here, we present a platform combining voltage or calcium two-photon imaging with multi-channel local field potential (LFP) recordings in different layers of the barrel cortex from anesthetized and awake head-restrained mice. A chronic cranial window with access port allows injecting a viral vector expressing GCaMP6f or the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) ANNINE-6plus, as well as entering the brain with a multi-channel neural probe. We present both average spontaneous activity and average evoked signals in response to multi-whisker air-puff stimulations. Time domain analysis shows the dependence of the evoked responses on the cortical layer and on the state of the animal, here separated into anesthetized, awake but resting, and running. The simultaneous data acquisition allows to compare the average membrane depolarization measured with ANNINE-6plus with the amplitude and shape of the LFP recordings. The calcium imaging data connects these data sets to the large existing database of this important second messenger. Interestingly, in the calcium imaging data, we found a few cells which showed a decrease in calcium concentration in response to vibrissa stimulation in awake mice. This system offers a multimodal technique to study the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal signals through a 3D architecture in vivo. It will provide novel insights on sensory coding, closing the gap between electrical and optical recordings.

History

References