Image_2_Role of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Heat Stress-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability in Acute Lung Injury.tiff (1.6 MB)

Image_2_Role of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Heat Stress-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability in Acute Lung Injury.tiff

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posted on 22.10.2020, 16:04 by Gengbiao Zhou, Zhenfeng Chen, Jieyu Li, Xiaotong Guo, Kaiwen Qin, Jiaqi Luo, Jiaqing Hu, Qiaobing Huang, Lei Su, Xiaohua Guo, Qiulin Xu
Objective

To study the role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by heat stress, to further explore the signal pathway by which RAGE contributes to heat-induced endothelia response, and thereby find a novel target for the clinical treatment of ALI (acute lung injury) induced by heatstroke.

Methods

This study established the animal model of heatstroke using RAGE knockout mice. We observed the role of RAGE in acute lung injury induced by heatstroke in mice by evaluating the leukocytes, neutrophils, and protein concentration in BALF (Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids), lung wet/dry ratio, histopathological changes, and the morphological ultrastructure of lung tissue and arterial blood gas analysis. To further study the mechanism, we established a heat stress model of HUVEC and concentrated on the role of RAGE and its signal pathway in the endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by heat stress, measuring Transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and western blot.

Results

RAGE played a key role in acute lung injury induced by heatstroke in mice. The mechanism C-Jun is located in the promoter region of the RAGE gene. C-Jun increased the RAGE protein expression while HSF1 suppressed RAGE protein expression. The overexpressed RAGE protein then increased HUVEC monolayer permeability by activating ERK and P38 MAPK under heat stress.

Conclusion

This study indicates the critical role of RAGE in heat stress-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in acute lung injury and suggests that RAGE could be a potential therapeutic target in protecting patients against acute lung injury induced by heatstroke.

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