Image_2_New Ecological Role of Seaweed Secondary Metabolites as Autotoxic and Allelopathic.jpg (3.37 MB)
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Image_2_New Ecological Role of Seaweed Secondary Metabolites as Autotoxic and Allelopathic.jpg

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posted on 25.05.2020, 04:32 by Daniela Bueno Sudatti, Heitor Monteiro Duarte, Angélica Ribeiro Soares, Leonardo Tavares Salgado, Renato Crespo Pereira

Allelopathy and autotoxicity are well-known biological processes in angiosperms but are very little explored or even unknown in seaweeds. In this study, extract and major pure compounds from two distinct populations of the red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea were investigated to evaluate the effect of autotoxicity through auto- and crossed experiments under laboratory conditions, using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging to measure inhibition of photosynthesis (ΦPSII) as a variable response. Individuals of L. dendroidea from Azeda beach were inhibited by their own extract (IC50 = 219 μg/ml) and the major compound elatol (IC50 = 87 μg/ml); both chemicals also inhibited this seaweed species from Forno beach (IC50 = 194 μg/ml for the extract and IC50 = 277 μg/ml for elatol). By contrast, the extract of L. dendroidea from Forno and its major compound obtusol showed no inhibitory effect in individuals of both populations; but obtusol was insoluble to be tested at higher concentrations, which could be active as observed for elatol. The Azeda population displayed higher susceptibility to the Azeda extract and to elatol, manifested on the first day, unlike Forno individuals, in which the effect was only detected on the second day; and inhibition of ΦPSII was more pronounced at apical than basal portions of the thalli of L. dendroidea. This first finding of seaweed autotoxicity and allelopathic effects revealed the potential of the chemistry of secondary metabolites for intra- and inter-populational interactions, and for structuring seaweed populations.

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