Image_2_Molecular Evolution and Stress and Phytohormone Responsiveness of SUT Genes in Gossypium hirsutum.TIF (2.61 MB)

Image_2_Molecular Evolution and Stress and Phytohormone Responsiveness of SUT Genes in Gossypium hirsutum.TIF

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posted on 23.10.2018, 04:18 by Wei Li, Kuan Sun, Zhongying Ren, Chengxiang Song, Xiaoyu Pei, Yangai Liu, Zhenyu Wang, Kunlun He, Fei Zhang, Xiaojian Zhou, Xiongfeng Ma, Daigang Yang

Sucrose transporters (SUTs) play key roles in allocating the translocation of assimilates from source to sink tissues. Although the characteristics and biological roles of SUTs have been intensively investigated in higher plants, this gene family has not been functionally characterized in cotton. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of SUT genes in the tetraploid cotton Gossypium hirsutum. A total of 18 G. hirsutum SUT genes were identified and classified into three groups based on their evolutionary relationships. Up to eight SUT genes in G. hirsutum were placed in the dicot-specific SUT1 group, while four and six SUT genes were, respectively, clustered into SUT4 and SUT2 groups together with members from both dicot and monocot species. The G. hirsutum SUT genes within the same group displayed similar exon/intron characteristics, and homologous genes in G. hirsutum At and Dt subgenomes, G. arboreum, and G. raimondii exhibited one-to-one relationships. Additionally, the duplicated genes in the diploid and polyploid cotton species have evolved through purifying selection, suggesting the strong conservation of SUT loci in these species. Expression analysis in different tissues indicated that SUT genes might play significant roles in cotton fiber elongation. Moreover, analyses of cis-acting regulatory elements in promoter regions and expression profiling under different abiotic stress and exogenous phytohormone treatments implied that SUT genes, especially GhSUT6A/D, might participate in plant responses to diverse abiotic stresses and phytohormones. Our findings provide valuable information for future studies on the evolution and function of SUT genes in cotton.

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