Image_2_Comprehensive Analysis of lncRNA and miRNA Regulatory Network Reveals Potential Prognostic Non-coding RNA Involved in Breast Cancer Progressio.TIF (7.18 MB)
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Image_2_Comprehensive Analysis of lncRNA and miRNA Regulatory Network Reveals Potential Prognostic Non-coding RNA Involved in Breast Cancer Progression.TIF

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posted on 18.06.2021, 04:59 authored by Sheng Gao, Xun Lu, Jingjing Ma, Qian Zhou, RanRan Tang, Ziyi Fu, Fengliang Wang, Mingming Lv, Cheng Lu

Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in women and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women. The tumorigenesis and progression of breast cancer are not well understood. The existing researches have indicated that non-coding RNAs, which mainly include long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and microRNA (miRNA), have gradually become important regulators of breast cancer. We aimed to screen the differential expression of miRNA and lncRNA in the different breast cancer stages and identify the key non-coding RNA using TCGA data. Based on series test of cluster (STC) analysis, bioinformatics analysis, and negatively correlated relationships, 122 lncRNAs, 67 miRNAs, and 119 mRNAs were selected to construct the regulatory network of lncRNA and miRNA. It was shown that the miR-93/20b/106a/106b family was at the center of the regulatory network. Furthermore, 6 miRNAs, 10 lncRNAs, and 15 mRNAs were significantly associated with the overall survival (OS, log-rank P < 0.05) of patients with breast cancer. Overexpressed miR-93 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells was associated with suppressed expression of multiple lncRNAs, and these downregulated lncRNAs (MESTIT1, LOC100128164, and DNMBP-AS1) were significantly associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the miR-93/20b/106a/106b family at the core of the regulatory network discovered by our analysis above may be extremely important for the regulation of lncRNA expression and the progression of breast cancer. The identified key miRNA and lncRNA will enhance the understanding of molecular mechanisms of breast cancer progression. Targeting these key non-coding RNA may provide new therapeutic strategies for breast cancer treatment and may prevent the progression of breast cancer from an early stage to an advanced stage.

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