Image_2_Comparing Temporospatial Performance During Brisk and Self-Paced Walking by Men With Osteomyoplastic Transfemoral Amputation and Controls Usin.JPEG (1006.22 kB)
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Image_2_Comparing Temporospatial Performance During Brisk and Self-Paced Walking by Men With Osteomyoplastic Transfemoral Amputation and Controls Using Pressure and Muscle Activation Peak Times.JPEG

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posted on 06.05.2022, 04:05 authored by Monique O. Shotande, Kimberly P. Veirs, Jonathan D. Day, William J. J. Ertl, Andrew H. Fagg, Carol P. Dionne
Background

The aim of osteomyoplastic transfemoral amputation (OTFA) is to produce sustained, robust prosthetic gait performance by residuum reconstructing. A better understanding of residuum-socket interface pressures (RSI) and residuum muscle activation should uniquely reveal gait stability to better inform long-term rehabilitation goals.

Objectives

The objectives of this study are to characterize RSI pressures and residuum muscle activation in men with OTFA while walking at two speeds and compare temporospatial muscle activation with intact controls.

Methods

In this study, we observed and compared healthy men with OTFA and controls during 2-min gait trials at brisk and self-paced speeds, two visits, and 1 year apart. RSI pressures and hip adductors, hamstrings, and quadriceps activation were recorded for those with OTFA. OTFA temporospatial muscle activation patterns were compared with the controls. Within the extracted strides, heel-strike and toe-off events and EMG activation peak times were characterized and compared. Peak times for pressure and EMG activity were examined in individual muscles and antagonist muscles of residual and intact limbs.

Results

Six men with OTFA exhibited adductor, hamstring, and quadriceps co-contraction within intact and residual limbs, regardless of walking speed or trial. Co-contraction within their intact limb occurred throughout the gait cycle. Within the residuum, co-contraction occurred during weight transference. The 75% most likely RSI peaks occurred during stance. EMG peaks were 75% most likely to occur during early stance, terminal stance-initial swing, and terminal swing.

Conclusion

Participants with OTFA demonstrated adductors-hamstrings-quadriceps co-contraction in the intact thigh and residuum with corresponding RSI pressure increase, primarily during transitions between stance and swing, indicating gait instability, demonstrating the need to explicitly address these deficits continuously in rehabilitation and wellness settings.

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