Image_2_Central and Peripheral Changes in FOS Expression in Schizophrenia Based on Genome-Wide Gene Expression.JPEG (107.14 kB)

Image_2_Central and Peripheral Changes in FOS Expression in Schizophrenia Based on Genome-Wide Gene Expression.JPEG

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posted on 22.03.2019 by Jing Huang, Fangkun Liu, Bolun Wang, Hui Tang, Ziwei Teng, Lehua Li, Yan Qiu, Haishan Wu, Jindong Chen

Schizophrenia is a chronic, debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder. Multiple transcriptomic gene expression profiling analysis has been used to identify schizophrenia-associated genes, unravel disease-associated biomarkers, and predict clinical outcomes. We aimed to identify gene expression regulation, underlying pathways, and their roles in schizophrenia pathogenesis. We searched the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database for microarray studies of fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, and post-mortem brains of schizophrenia patients. Our analysis demonstrated high FOS expression in non-neural peripheral samples and low FOS expression in brain tissues of schizophrenia patients compared with healthy controls. FOS exhibited predictive value for schizophrenia patients in these datasets. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis revealed that “amphetamine addiction” was among the top 10 significantly enriched KEGG pathways. FOS and FOSB, which are implicated in the amphetamine addiction pathway, were up-regulated in schizophrenia fibroblast samples. Protein–protein interaction (PPI) network analysis revealed that proteins closely interacting with FOS-encoded protein were also involved in the amphetamine addiction pathway. Pearson correlation test indicated that FOS showed positive correlation with genes in the amphetamine pathway. The results revealed that FOS was acceptable as a biomarker for schizophrenia and may be involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis.

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