Image_2_CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated OC-2 Editing Inhibits the Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis of Ovarian Cancer.TIF (996.37 kB)
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Image_2_CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated OC-2 Editing Inhibits the Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis of Ovarian Cancer.TIF

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posted on 02.09.2020, 04:24 authored by Tongyi Lu, Ligang Zhang, Wenhui Zhu, Yinmei Zhang, Simin Zhang, Binhua Wu, Ning Deng

Ovarian cancer is the leading cancer-related cause of death in women worldwide. It is of great relevance to understand the mechanism responsible for tumor progression and identify unique oncogenesis markers for a higher chance of preventing this malignant disease. The high-expression OC-2 gene has been shown to be a potential candidate for regulating oncogenesis and angiogenesis in ovarian cancer. Hence, we wished to investigate the impact of OC-2 gene on ovarian cancer aggressiveness. CRISPR/Cas9, a gene editing tool, allows for direct ablation of OC-2 at the genomic level, and we successfully generated OC-2 KO cell lines from SKOV3 and CAOV3 cells. In an apoptosis assay, OC-2 KO induced the apoptosis activation of tumor cells, with the up-regulation of Bax/Caspase-8 and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Consequently, the proliferation, migration, and invasion of OC-2 KO cell lines were significantly inhibited. Assays of qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors VEGFA, FGF2, HGF, and HIF-1α and the activation of Akt/ERK pathways were significantly down-regulated at the loss of OC-2. In the xenograft model, OC-2 KO potently suppressed the subcutaneous tumor growth, with the inhibition exceeding 56%. The down-regulation of CD31 and relevant pro-angiogenic growth factors were observed in OC-2 KO tumor tissues. Taken together, OC-2 depletion negatively regulated the ovarian cancer progression possibly by apoptosis activation and angiogenesis inhibition. This work revealed a pivotal regulator of apoptosis and angiogenesis networks in ovarian cancer, and we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to the transcription factor pathway for developing a broad-acting anti-tumor gene therapy.

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