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posted on 01.04.2021, 05:23 by Fengping Liu, Xuefang Xu, Lin Chao, Ke Chen, Amo Shao, Danqin Sun, Yan Hong, Renjing Hu, Peng Jiang, Nan Zhang, Yonghong Xiao, Feng Yan, Ninghan Feng
Objectives

Gut dysbiosis is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and serum free immunoglobulin light chains (FLCs) are biomarkers for CKD. This study aims to assess the CKD gut microbiome and to determine its impact on serum FLC levels.

Methods

To control for confounders, 100 patients and sex- and age-matched healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. The gut microbiome was assessed by sequencing 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 hypervariable regions. Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States was applied to infer functional metabolic pathways. When observing group differences in the microbiome and predicted metabolic pathways, demographic confounders were adjusted using binary logistic regression; when examining impacts of the gut microbiome and metabolic pathways on serum FLCs, factors influencing FLC levels were adjusted using multiple regression.

Results

Principal coordinate analysis revealed a significantly different bacterial community between the CKD and HC groups (P < 0.05). After adjusting for confounders, lower Chao 1, observed species and Shannon indices based on binary logistic regression predicted CKD prevalence. Actinobacteria, Alistipes, Bifidobacterium and Bifidobacterium longum enrichment, upregulation of metabolic pathways of bacterial toxin, chloroalkane and chloroalkene degradation, and Staphylococcus aureus infection also predicted CKD prevalence (P < 0.05). Furthermore, depletion of Actinobacteria and Bifidobacterium and reduced chloroalkane and chloroalkene degradation predicted high levels of FLC λ (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

Gut dysbiosis in CKD patients was confirmed by controlling for confounders in the present study. Additionally, the association between gut dysbiosis and FLC λ levels demonstrates the existence of crosstalk between the microbiome and immune response in CKD.

History

References