Image_1_Soil Particles and Phenanthrene Interact in Defining the Metabolic Profile of Pseudomonas putida G7: A Vibrational Spectroscopy Approach.pdf (1.16 MB)
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Image_1_Soil Particles and Phenanthrene Interact in Defining the Metabolic Profile of Pseudomonas putida G7: A Vibrational Spectroscopy Approach.pdf

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posted on 04.12.2018, 04:11 by Andrea Fanesi, Asfaw Zegeye, Christian Mustin, Aurélie Cébron

In soil, organic matter and mineral particles (soil particles; SPs) strongly influence the bio-available fraction of organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the metabolic activity of bacteria. However, the effect of SPs as well as comparative approaches to discriminate the metabolic responses to PAHs from those to simple carbon sources are seldom considered in mineralization experiments, limiting our knowledge concerning the dynamics of contaminants in soil. In this study, the metabolic profile of a model PAH-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas putida G7, grown in the absence and presence of different SPs (i.e., sand, clays and humic acids), using either phenanthrene or glucose as the sole carbon and energy source, was characterized using vibrational spectroscopy (i.e., FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy) and multivariate classification analysis (i.e., PLS-DA). The different type of SPs specifically altered the metabolic profile of P. putida, especially in combination with phenanthrene. In comparison to the cells grown in the absence of SPs, sand induced no remarkable change in the metabolic profile of the cells, whereas clays and humic acids affected it the most, as revealed by the higher discriminative accuracy (R2, RMSEP and sensitivity) of the PLS-DA for those conditions. With respect to the carbon-source (phenanthrene vs. glucose), no effect on the metabolic profile was evident in the absence of SPs or in the presence of sand. On the other hand, with clays and humic acids, more pronounced spectral clusters between cells grown on glucose or on phenanthrene were evident, suggesting that these SPs modify the way cells access and metabolize PAHs. The macromolecular changes regarded mainly protein secondary structures (a shift from α-helices to β-sheets), amino acid levels, nucleic acid conformation and cell wall carbohydrates. Our results provide new interesting evidences that SPs specifically interact with PAHs in defining bacteria metabolic profiles and further emphasize the importance of studying the interaction of bacteria with their surrounding matrix to deeply understand PAHs degradation in soils.

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