Image_1_Single-Pulse TMS to the Temporo-Occipital and Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Evokes Lateralized Long Latency EEG Responses at the Stimulation .JPEG (131.11 kB)
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Image_1_Single-Pulse TMS to the Temporo-Occipital and Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Evokes Lateralized Long Latency EEG Responses at the Stimulation Site.JPEG

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posted on 12.03.2021, 05:18 authored by Tomasz A. Jarczok, Friederike Roebruck, Lena Pokorny, Lea Biermann, Veit Roessner, Christoph Klein, Stephan Bender
Introduction

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)–evoked potentials (TEPs) allow for probing cortical functions in health and pathology. However, there is uncertainty whether long-latency TMS-evoked potentials reflect functioning of the targeted cortical area. It has been suggested that components such as the TMS-evoked N100 are stereotypical and related to nonspecific sensory processes rather than transcranial effects of the changing magnetic field. In contrast, TEPs that vary according to the targeted brain region and are systematically lateralized toward the stimulated hemisphere can be considered to reflect activity in the stimulated brain region resulting from transcranial electromagnetic induction.

Methods

TMS with concurrent 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was sequentially performed in homologous areas of both hemispheres. One sample of healthy adults received TMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; another sample received TMS to the temporo-occipital cortex. We analyzed late negative TEP deflections corresponding to the N100 component in motor cortex stimulation.

Results

TEP topography varied according to the stimulation target site. Long-latency negative TEP deflections were systematically lateralized (higher in ipsilateral compared to contralateral electrodes) in electrodes over the stimulated brain region. A calculation that removes evoked components that are not systematically lateralized relative to the stimulated hemisphere revealed negative maxima located around the respective target sites.

Conclusion

TEPs contain long-latency negative components that are lateralized toward the stimulated hemisphere and have their topographic maxima at the respective stimulation sites. They can be differentiated from co-occurring components that are invariable across different stimulation sites (probably reflecting coactivation of peripheral sensory afferences) according to their spatiotemporal patterns. Lateralized long-latency TEP components located at the stimulation site likely reflect activity evoked in the targeted cortex region by direct transcranial effects and are therefore suitable for assessing cortical functions.

History

References