Frontiers
Browse
Image_1_Self-Stigma Among People With Mental Health Problems in Terms of Warmth and Competence.TIFF (706.89 kB)

Image_1_Self-Stigma Among People With Mental Health Problems in Terms of Warmth and Competence.TIFF

Download (706.89 kB)
figure
posted on 2022-06-14, 04:42 authored by Laura Gärtner, Frank Asbrock, Frank Euteneuer, Winfried Rief, Stefan Salzmann
Introduction

Self-stigma arising from public stigma is a heavy burden for people suffering from mental health problems. Both public stigma and self-stigma encompass the same three elements: stereotype, prejudice, and discrimination. Public stigma has already been successfully explored by the Stereotype Content Model (SCM) and the Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes (BIAS) map. However, this is not the case for self-stigma. Therefore, this is the first study that applies SCM and the BIAS map to self-stigma by examining whether the effects of self-stereotypes on self-directed discrimination would be mediated by self-directed prejudices in people with mental health problems.

Method

Within a total sample of N = 823 participants, who took part in an online survey, n = 336 people reported mental health problems. Mental health and self-stereotypes (warmth, competence), self-directed prejudice (negative emotions), and self-directed discrimination (active/passive self-harm) were assessed.

Results

Structural equation modeling supported the hypothesis that the stereotype dimensions warmth and competence negatively related to prejudice, while stronger prejudice was associated with more discrimination (active/passive self-harm). Prejudice fully mediated the relationship between stereotypes and discrimination. The indirect effects of warmth and competence on active and passive self-harm were moderated by competence and warmth.

Discussion

Implications for further research on self-stigma and the usage of SCM and BIAS map are discussed.

History