Image_1_Risk Factors for Mortality From Late-Onset Sepsis Among Preterm Very-Low-Birthweight Infants: A Single-Center Cohort Study From Singapore.JPEG (2.46 MB)
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Image_1_Risk Factors for Mortality From Late-Onset Sepsis Among Preterm Very-Low-Birthweight Infants: A Single-Center Cohort Study From Singapore.JPEG

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posted on 31.01.2022, 05:03 authored by Guan Lin Goh, Charis Shu En Lim, Rehena Sultana, Rowena De La Puerta, Victor Samuel Rajadurai, Kee Thai Yeo
Objective

To determine the risk factors for mortality associated with late onset sepsis (LOS) among preterm very-low-birthweight (VLBW) infants.

Study Design

We performed a retrospective cohort study of infants born <32 weeks gestation and <1,500 gm admitted to a Singaporean tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit. We determined the clinical, microbial, and laboratory risk factors associated with mortality due to culture-positive LOS in this cohort.

Results

A total of 1,740 infants were admitted, of which 169 (9.7%) developed LOS and 27 (16%) died. Compared to survivors, those who died had lower birth gestational age (median 24 vs. 25 weeks, p = 0.02) and earlier LOS occurrence (median 10 vs. 17 days, p = 0.007). There was no difference in the incidence of meningitis (11.1 vs. 16.9%, p = 0.3), NEC (18.5 vs. 14.8%, p = 0.6), or intestinal surgery (18.5 vs. 23.3%, p = 0.6) among infants who died compared to survivors. Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 21/27 (77.8%) LOS-associated deaths and almost all (13/14, 93%) fulminant episodes. The presence of multiorgan failure, as evidenced by the need for mechanical ventilation (100 vs. 79.0%, p = 0.008), elevated lactate (12.4 vs. 2.1 mmol/L, p < 0.001), and inotropic support (92.6 vs. 37.5%, p < 0.001), was significantly associated with mortality. Infants who died had significantly lower white blood cell (WBC) counts (median 4.2 × 109/L vs. 9.9 × 109/L, p = 0.001), lower platelet count (median 40 × 109/L vs. 62 × 109/L, p = 0.01), and higher immature to total neutrophil (I: T) ratio (0.2 vs. 0.1, p = 0.002). Inotrope requirement [AOR 22.4 (95%CI 2.9, 103.7)], WBC <4 × 109/L [AOR 4.7 (1.7, 13.2)], and I: T ratio >0.3 [AOR 3.6 (1.3, 9.7)] were independently associated with LOS mortality.

Conclusions

In a setting with predominantly Gram-negative bacterial infections, the need for inotropic support, leukopenia, and elevated I: T ratio were significantly associated with LOS mortality among preterm VLBW infants.

History

References