Image_1_Response of Fungal Communities and Co-occurrence Network Patterns to Compost Amendment in Black Soil of Northeast China.PNG (41.15 kB)

Image_1_Response of Fungal Communities and Co-occurrence Network Patterns to Compost Amendment in Black Soil of Northeast China.PNG

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posted on 09.07.2019, 04:48 by Wei Yang, Xuyuan Jing, Yupeng Guan, Cheng Zhai, Tao Wang, Dengyu Shi, Wenpeng Sun, Siyu Gu

In agroecosystems, fungi not only attract attention as crop pathogens, but also play crucial roles in nutrient cycling as decomposers and arbuscular mycorrhizal mutualists. Consequently soil fungi strongly influence agroecosystem function, and are conspicuously influenced by agricultural practices. We examined the effects of four compost rates (0, 11.25, 22.5, and 45 Mg ha−1) on soil fungal community compositions and network patterns in soybean at seedling, flowering, and mature stage in a field experiment in black soil of Northeast China. Miseq sequencing was used to characterize the soil fungal community. Our results revealed that soil fungal richness was unaffected by compost addition, while soil fungal community composition was significantly influenced by compost addition across the growing season. Among the combined “top 20” fungal OTUs, 15 OTUs positively responded to compost addition, while 10 negatively responded. The abundance of predicted pathotroph was greatly decreased by the 45 Mg ha−1 compost addition. Network analysis indicated that the fungal networks in compost amended soils were more complex and harbored more positive links than the control. Fungal network harbored more positive links among saprotroph-saprotroph and saprotroph-symbiotroph in moderate level of compost amended soils than other networks. In conclusion, this study revealed that compost addition impacted positively both the soil fungal communities and network patterns within a single growing season. Thus, compost addition could be a good practice to enhance the soil fungal community and function and ultimately soil health and quality.

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