Image_1_Probiotic Consortia: Reshaping the Rhizospheric Microbiome and Its Role in Suppressing Root-Rot Disease of Panax notoginseng.TIF (911.11 kB)
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Image_1_Probiotic Consortia: Reshaping the Rhizospheric Microbiome and Its Role in Suppressing Root-Rot Disease of Panax notoginseng.TIF

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posted on 30.04.2020, 11:24 by Jinhao Zhang, Lanfang Wei, Jun Yang, Waqar Ahmed, Yating Wang, Lina Fu, Guanghai Ji

Root-rot disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum is a growing problem in agriculture for commercial cultivation of Panax notoginseng. Diverse microbes colonize plant roots, and numerous earlier studies have characterized the rhizospheric microbiome of P. notoginseng; nevertheless, the function of probiotic consortia on the rhizospheric microbiome against the root-rot disease remain elusive. We have compared and described the rhizospheric microbiome of lightly and severely diseased P. notoginseng as well as the interactions of the probiotic consortia and rhizospheric microbiome, and their function to alleviate the plant diseases were explored by inoculating probiotic consortia in bulk soil. From the perspective of microbial diversity, the rhizospheric dominant bacterial and fungal genera were utterly different between lightly and severely diseased plants. Through inoculating assembled probiotic consortia to diseased plant roots, we found that the application of probiotic consortia reshaped the rhizosphere microbiome, increasing the relative abundance of bacteria and fungi, while the relative abundance of potential pathogens was decreased significantly. We developed a microcosm system that provides a preliminary ecological framework for constructing an active probiotic community to reshape soil microbiota and restrain the disease. Microbial community structure differs between lightly and seriously diseased plants. The application of probiotic consortia changes the imbalance of micro-ecology to a state of relative health, reducing plant mortality. Plant disease suppression may be achieved by seeking and applying antagonistic microbes based on their direct inhibitory capability or by restructuring the soil microbiome structure and function.

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