Image_1_Mutation of an L-Type Calcium Channel Gene Leads to T Lymphocyte Dysfunction.pdf (498.85 kB)

Image_1_Mutation of an L-Type Calcium Channel Gene Leads to T Lymphocyte Dysfunction.pdf

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posted on 29.10.2019, 14:04 by Franz Fenninger, Jeffrey Han, Shawna R. Stanwood, Lilian L. Nohara, Hitesh Arora, Kyung Bok Choi, Lonna Munro, Cheryl G. Pfeifer, Iryna Shanina, Marc S. Horwitz, Wilfred A. Jefferies

Calcium (Ca2+) is a vital secondary messenger in T lymphocytes regulating a vast array of important events including maturation, homeostasis, activation, and apoptosis and can enter the cell through CRAC, TRP, and CaV channels. Here we describe a mutation in the L-type Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 leading to T lymphocyte dysfunction, including several hallmarks of immunological exhaustion. CaV1.4-deficient mice exhibited an expansion of central and effector memory T lymphocytes, and an upregulation of inhibitory receptors on several T cell subsets. Moreover, the sustained elevated levels of activation markers on B lymphocytes suggest that they are in a chronic state of activation. Functionally, T lymphocytes exhibited a reduced store-operated Ca2+ flux compared to wild-type controls. Finally, modifying environmental conditions by herpes virus infection exacerbated the dysfunctional immune phenotype of the CaV1.4-deficient mice. This is the first example where the mutation of a CaV channel leads to T lymphocyte dysfunction, including the upregulation of several inhibitory receptors, hallmarks of T cell exhaustion, and establishes the physiological importance of CaV channel signaling in maintaining a nimble immune system. In sum, a mutation in the L-type Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 leads to T cell dysfunction.

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