Image_1_Interaction of the New Monofunctional Anticancer Agent Phenanthriplatin With Transporters for Organic Cations.PDF (251.14 kB)

Image_1_Interaction of the New Monofunctional Anticancer Agent Phenanthriplatin With Transporters for Organic Cations.PDF

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posted on 25.05.2018 by Anna Hucke, Ga Young Park, Oliver B. Bauer, Georg Beyer, Christina Köppen, Dorothea Zeeh, Christoph A. Wehe, Michael Sperling, Rita Schröter, Marta Kantauskaitè, Yohannes Hagos, Uwe Karst, Stephen J. Lippard, Giuliano Ciarimboli

Cancer treatment with platinum compounds is an important achievement of modern chemotherapy. However, despite the beneficial effects, the clinical impact of these agents is hampered by the development of drug resistance as well as dose-limiting side effects. The efficacy but also side effects of platinum complexes can be mediated by uptake through plasma membrane transporters. In the kidneys, plasma membrane transporters are involved in their secretion into the urine. Renal secretion is accomplished by uptake from the blood into the proximal tubules cells, followed by excretion into the urine. The uptake process is mediated mainly by organic cation transporters (OCT), which are expressed in the basolateral domain of the plasma membrane facing the blood. The excretion of platinum into the urine is mediated by exchange with protons via multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATE) expressed in the apical domain of plasma membrane. Recently, the monofunctional, cationic platinum agent phenanthriplatin, which is able to escape common cellular resistance mechanisms, has been synthesized and investigated. In the present study, the interaction of phenanthriplatin with transporters for organic cations has been evaluated. Phenanthriplatin is a high affinity substrate for OCT2, but has a lower apparent affinity for MATEs. The presence of these transporters increased cytotoxicity of phenanthriplatin. Therefore, phenanthriplatin may be especially effective in the treatment of cancers that express OCTs, such as colon cancer cells. However, the interaction of phenanthriplatin with OCTs suggests that its use as chemotherapeutic agent may be complicated by OCT-mediated toxicity. Unlike cisplatin, phenanthriplatin interacts with high specificity with hMATE1 and hMATE2K in addition to hOCT2. This interaction may facilitate its efflux from the cells and thereby decrease overall efficacy and/or toxicity.

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