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posted on 19.06.2020, 09:59 by Sami Bahlas, Laila A. Damiati, Ayman S. Al-Hazmi, Peter Natesan Pushparaj

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic sphingolipid derived by the phosphorylation of sphingosine either by sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) or SPHK2. Importantly, S1P acts through five different types of G-protein coupled S1P receptors (S1PRs) in immune cells to elicit inflammation and other immunological processes by enhancing the production of various cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. The airway inflammation in asthma and other respiratory diseases is augmented by the activation of immune cells and the induction of T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)-associated cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, studying the S1P mediated signaling in airway inflammation is crucial to formulate effective treatment and management strategies for asthma and other respiratory diseases. The central aim of this study is to characterize the molecular targets induced through the S1P/S1PR axis and dissect the therapeutic importance of this key axis in asthma, airway inflammation, and other related respiratory diseases. To achieve this, we have adopted both high throughput next-generation knowledge discovery platforms such as SwissTargetPrediction, WebGestalt, Open Targets Platform, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, United States) to delineate the molecular targets of S1P and further validated the upstream regulators of S1P signaling using cutting edge multiple analyte profiling (xMAP) technology (Luminex Corporation, United States) to define the importance of S1P signaling in asthma and other respiratory diseases in humans.

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