Image_1_Cyanobacterial Community Composition and Bacteria–Bacteria Interactions Promote the Stable Occurrence of Particle-Associated Bacteria.TIFF (196.02 kB)
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Image_1_Cyanobacterial Community Composition and Bacteria–Bacteria Interactions Promote the Stable Occurrence of Particle-Associated Bacteria.TIFF

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posted on 26.04.2018, 04:05 authored by Jason N. Woodhouse, Jennifer Ziegler, Hans-Peter Grossart, Brett A. Neilan

Within meso/eutrophic freshwater ecosystems the dominance of cyanobacterial blooms during summer months has substantial impacts on ecosystem function with the production of toxins and subsequent induction of hypoxia altering food web structures and biogeochemical cycles. Cyanobacterial aggregates are extensively colonized by heterotrophic bacteria that provide the cyanobacteria with key nutrients and contribute towards remineralisation of organic matter. Here we sampled from five sites within a shallow eutrophic pond over a 6 months period, relating changes in the abundance of particle-associated heterotrophic taxa to phytoplankton abundance, toxin gene copies and physiochemical properties. The abundance of a majority of particle-associated bacteria were stable, in that they persisted despite perturbation. Cyanobacterial species abundance more likely correlated with stable rather than unstable bacteria and unstable bacteria were associated with allochthonous (terrestrial) organic matter. The occurrence of the most stable bacteria was correlated with large numbers of other bacteria suggesting bacteria-bacteria interactions have implications for the stable occurrence of microorganisms on particles. Freshwater ecosystems are frequently inundated with fresh nutrients in the form of surface runoff and experience an increasing number of high temperature days. In addition to increasing the severity and longevity of cyanobacterial blooms, run-off changes the nature of the particle-associated community compromising stability. This disruption has the potential to drive changes in the carbon and nitrogen cycles and requires further attention.

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