Image_1_Comparative Transcriptomics and Metabolomics Reveal an Intricate Priming Mechanism Involved in PGPR-Mediated Salt Tolerance in Tomato.JPEG (427.06 kB)
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posted on 17.08.2021, 04:40 by Ifigeneia Mellidou, Aggeliki Ainalidou, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Kleopatra Leontidou, Savvas Genitsaris, Evangelos Karagiannis, Bram Van de Poel, Katerina Karamanoli

Plant-associated beneficial strains inhabiting plants grown under harsh ecosystems can help them cope with abiotic stress factors by positively influencing plant physiology, development, and environmental adaptation. Previously, we isolated a potential plant growth promoting strain (AXSa06) identified as Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, possessing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity, producing indole-3-acetic acid and siderophores, as well as solubilizing inorganic phosphorus. In this study, we aimed to further evaluate the effects of AXSa06 seed inoculation on the growth of tomato seedlings under excess salt (200 mM NaCl) by deciphering their transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles. Differences in transcript levels and metabolites following AXSa06 inoculation seem likely to have contributed to the observed difference in salt adaptation of inoculated plants. In particular, inoculations exerted a positive effect on plant growth and photosynthetic parameters, imposing plants to a primed state, at which they were able to respond more robustly to salt stress probably by efficiently activating antioxidant metabolism, by dampening stress signals, by detoxifying Na+, as well as by effectively assimilating carbon and nitrogen. The primed state of AXSa06-inoculated plants is supported by the increased leaf lipid peroxidation, ascorbate content, as well as the enhanced activities of antioxidant enzymes, prior to stress treatment. The identified signatory molecules of AXSa06-mediated salt tolerance included the amino acids aspartate, threonine, serine, and glutamate, as well as key genes related to ethylene or abscisic acid homeostasis and perception, and ion antiporters. Our findings represent a promising sustainable solution to improve agricultural production under the forthcoming climate change conditions.

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