Image_1_Asthmatic Bronchial Smooth Muscle Increases CCL5-Dependent Monocyte Migration in Response to Rhinovirus-Infected Epithelium.TIF (232.99 kB)
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Image_1_Asthmatic Bronchial Smooth Muscle Increases CCL5-Dependent Monocyte Migration in Response to Rhinovirus-Infected Epithelium.TIF

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posted on 06.01.2020, 13:27 authored by Benoit Allard, Hannah Levardon, Pauline Esteves, Alexis Celle, Elise Maurat, Matthieu Thumerel, Pierre Olivier Girodet, Thomas Trian, Patrick Berger

Asthma exacerbations, a major concern in therapeutic strategies, are most commonly triggered by viral respiratory infections, particularly with human rhinovirus (HRV). Infection of bronchial epithelial (BE) cells by HRV triggers inflammation, notably monocyte recruitment. The increase of bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) mass in asthma, a hallmark of bronchial remodeling, is associated with the annual rate of exacerbations. The aim of the present study was to assess whether or not BSM could increase monocyte migration induced by HRV-infected BE. We used an advanced in vitro model of co-culture of human BE cells in air-liquid interface with human BSM cells from control and asthmatic patients. Inflammation triggered by HRV infection (HRV-16, MOI 0.1, 1 h) was assessed at 24 h with transcriptomic analysis and multiplex ELISA. In vitro CD14+ monocyte migration was evaluated with modified Boyden chamber. Results showed that HRV-induced monocyte migration was substantially increased in the co-culture model with asthmatic BSM, compared with control BSM. Furthermore, the well-known monocyte migration chemokine, CCL2, was not involved in this increased migration. However, we demonstrated that CCL5 was further increased in the asthmatic BSM co-culture and that anti-CCL5 blocking antibody significantly decreased monocyte migration induced by HRV-infected BE. Taken together, our findings highlight a new role of BSM cells in HRV-induced inflammation and provide new insights in mucosal immunology which may open new opportunities for prevention and/or treatment of asthma exacerbation.

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